North Korea War 2017

Picture of North Korea War 2017

Updated | The batteries of North Korean artillery lie just on the other side of the divided peninsula’s demilitarized zone. There are thousands of them—some hidden, others out in the open. Artillery shells are stored in an elaborate network of tunnels; and though much of the weaponry and ammunition is old, U.S. forces stationed in South Korea have no doubt they would be effective. Less than 40 miles to the south is the sprawling city of Seoul, the capital of South Korea, with a metropolitan area of 24 million inhabitants.

Ever since a cease-fire ended hostilities between North and South Korea in 1953, the residents of Seoul have lived with the knowledge that a war with their brethren in the north could break out again; it is a notion not often acknowledged but embedded in their DNA. And now, again, the fraught Korean Peninsula seems a single miscalculation away from calamity. Since his election, President Donald Trump and his foreign policy team have escalated their rhetoric about the North, insisting that U.

S. patience with North Korea’s nuclear and missile program has run out. Pyongyang has responded with rhetoric even more bellicose than usual. On April 20, a state-owned newspaper threatened that Pyongyang would deliver a “super-mighty pre-emptive strike’’ against the U.S., whose forces were in the midst of massive military exercises with their South Korean ally. Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now No one in Seoul is heading for the bomb shelters yet.

Pragmatism, and an abiding assumption that nothing terribly bad will actually happen, prevails. “No matter how much tensions increase, we just go about our lives,” says Park Chung Hee, a 40-year-old businessman whose grandfather was killed in the Korean War. “What else can we do?” But everyone living on the peninsula knows that those North Korean artillery batteries are there to pummel Seoul if another war breaks out.

And that if it does, Seoul will get hit, and hit hard. The amount of time from the instant a shell is fired to impact in the South Korean capital? Just 45 seconds. U.S. alarm about North Korea has spiked for two main reasons: The first is the aggressive missile-testing regimen Pyongyang has carried out under Kim Jong Un. During his four-year reign, Pyongyang has already test-fired 66 missiles, more than twice as many as his father Kim Jong Il did during his 17 years in office.

Kim’s regime has gradually increased the range of its missiles. Combine that with the North’s efforts to miniaturize its nuclear arsenal, so that its 10 to 16 bombs can fit onto a warhead, “and you have two streams coming together—range and miniaturization—that you don’t want to cross,” says retired Admiral James Stavridis, now dean of the Fletcher School for diplomacy at Tufts University.

An underwater test-firing of a strategic submarine ballistic missile in an undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang on April 24, 2016. KCNA/Reuters Some U.S. commanders fear the North can already put a nuclear warhead on a missile. Admiral Bill Gortney, head of the North American Aerospace Command, told Congress two years ago that he believes Pyongyang can use a medium-range missile to deliver a nuclear payload, meaning it can hit South Korea or Japan.

The consensus intelligence estimate is that the North is now 18 to 36 months away from sticking a nuke on a missile that can reach Los Angeles. All that explains why from both current and former military officials, there has been increasing talk of pre-emption. In November 2016, General Walter Sharp, former commander of U.S. Forces Korea, stated that if North Korea puts a long-range missile on a launch pad, and the U.

S. is unsure of its payload, Washington should order a pre-emptive attack to destroy that missile. But the grim reality is that a pre-emptive strike, against North Korean missiles or nuclear facilities—or both—could well mean war. Should the day come when President Trump believes he needs to order a pre-emptive strike against targets in North Korea to eliminate a direct threat, the U.S will not be able to take out all of the North Korean artillery front loaded near the border.

“Not,” says former National Security Council staffer Victor Cha, “without using tactical nuclear weapons,” which is not something the U.S. would consider, given that Seoul is right down the road. A U.S. strike, simply put, could well trigger the second Korean War. What would another armed conflict on the peninsula look like? During the Korean War, which lasted from 1950 to 1953, some 2.7 million Koreans died, along with 33,000 Americans and 800,000 Chinese.

In any pre-emption scenario now, the U.S. would try keep the strike limited to the task at hand; at the same time Washington would signal in any way it could—probably via the North’s ally in Beijing--that it did not seek a wider war. For the past two years, the U.S. and South Korea have been practicing pre-emption exercises. In 2015, they adopted a new war plan, OPLAN 5015, which includes attacks on the North’s nuclear and missile facilities, as well as “decapitation attacks” against Kim Jong Un and the rest of the North Korean leadership.

South Korea also developed its own pre-emptive attack plans, and has acquired, U.S. and Korean officials say, weapons capable of destroying some of North Korea’s weapons of mass destruction. Seoul has also built an elaborate defense system, which includes the recent delivery of the U.S. terminal high altitude area defense system, which shoots down incoming missiles in the final phase of their descent.

The U.S. does not want to have to pre-empt, of course. As Trump’s National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster said on April 16, every option “short of war” is on the table in order to dissuade the North from deploying nukes on long-range missiles. “No one is looking for a fight here,” insists another Trump adviser not authorized to speak about this matter on the record. A cutout of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is set alight during an anti-North Korean rally in Seoul, South Korea, on August 21, 2015.

Kim Hong-Ji/Reuters Whether it does will come down to how Kim reacts to the pressure now being put on him from the West. The U.S. knows relatively little about the young man’s psyche and stability, but what it does know isn’t encouraging. In addition to his aggressive missile testing program, Kim has a new war plan of his own: to complete an invasion of South Korea within a week using asymmetric capabilities (including nuclear weapons and missiles).

Reunification of the two Koreas under Pyongyang’s rule, as ludicrous as that possibility seems to the outside world, has always been the foremost goal of both Kim Jong Un and his father. For a while, in the wake of the famine in the late 1990s that killed tens of thousands of North Koreans and the deep, relentless poverty that followed, military strategists began to discount that possibility, believing it to be rhetoric unmoored from reality.

All you had to do was look at the satellite images of Seoul and Pyongyang at night, one brightly lit and the other dark, to see which half of Korea was strong, and which was weak. And although the economic disparity hasn’t changed much, the North’s weaponry has, its war plan has, and its dictator’s bellicose rhetoric has. The young man known in China as “Fatty Kim the Third” (Kim Jong Un is the grandson of Kim Il Sung, who was the supreme leader of Democratic People’s Republic of Korea from its founding in 1948 until 1994) appears to be serious about being a nuclear power.

In speeches, he mentions the reunification far more often than his father did, North Korea watchers say. If the U.S. launches a pre-emptive strike, Kim appears likely to hit back, starting with an artillery barrage—thousands of rounds per hour. “Without moving a single soldier in its million-man army,” says former CIA analyst Bruce Klingner, now at the Heritage Foundation, “the North could launch a devastating attack on Seoul.

” Would the two sides be able to de-escalate at that point? A senior North Korean military defector has said that under Kim’s new war plan, the North intends to try to occupy all of South Korea before significant U.S. reinforcements could flow in from Japan and elsewhere. This invasion could start, Cha wrote in his recent book, The Impossible State , by terrorizing the South Korean population with chemical weapons.

“An arsenal of 600 chemically armed Scud missiles would be fired on all South Korean airports, train stations and marine ports, making it impossible for civilians to escape.” The North’s arsenal of medium-range missiles could also be fitted with chemical warheads and launched at Japan, delaying the flow of U.S. reinforcements. And those reinforcements would be urgently needed on the Korean Peninsula, since the U.

S. has only 28,000 troops in South Korea, and the Seoul's armed forces, though far better trained and equipped than the North’s, consist of 660,000 men, more than 300,000 smaller than Pyongyang's. Vice President Mike Pence looks at North Korea from an observation post in the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) which has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War, on April 17. U.S. strikes earlier this month against Syria, coupled with President Donald Trump's dispatching of what he called an “armada” of U.

S. warships to the Korean region, touched off fears that the United States was preparing for military action. Lee Jin-man/AP U.S. war planners believe North Korean forces would to try to overrun South Korea’s defenses and get to Seoul before the U.S. and the South could respond with overwhelming force. As Cha says, “as wars go, this would be the most unforgiving battle conditions that can be imagined—an extremely high density of enemy and allied forces—over 2 million mechanized forces all converging on a total battlespace the equivalent of the distance between Washington, D.

C., and Boston.’’ The United States would immediately dispatch four to six ground combat divisions of up to 20,000 troops each, 10 Air Force wings of about 20 fighters per unit and four to five aircraft carriers. In Cha’s scenario, U.S. and South Korean “soldiers would be fighting with little defense against DPRK artillery, aerial bombardments, and in an urban warfare environment polluted by 5,000 metric tons of DPRK chemical agents.

” Even if that artillery barrage and push into the South gave the North the initiative, there is no question, military planners all say, who would ultimately prevail in a second Korean War. The U.S. and South Korea have far too much firepower, and if Kim Jong Un decided to go to war, that would be end of his regime, whether he knows it or not. But this would not be a one-week walkover, like the first Gulf War against Saddam Hussein, when his forces were arrayed like clay pigeons in the Iraqi and Kuwaiti deserts, where they were easily destroyed by U.

S. air power. Conventional thinking in the Pentagon is that it would be a four- to six-month conflict with high-intensity combat and many dead. In 1994, when President Bill Clinton contemplated the use of force to knock out the North’s nuclear weapons program, the then commander of U.S.-Republic of Korea forces, Gary Luck, told his commander in chief that a war on the peninsula would likely result in 1 million dead, and nearly $1 trillion of economic damage.

The carnage would conceivably be worse now, given that the U.S. believes Pyongyang has 10 to 16 nuclear weapons. If the North could figure out a way to deliver one, why wouldn’t Kim go all in? Has the messaging so far from the Trump administration regarding North Korea made war more or less likely? Trump was sobered by the Obama administration’s counsel that things with North Korea were becoming more dangerous.

He initiated a comprehensive policy review shortly after taking office, which led to press reports that “all options” were on the table (including use of force) in dealing with North Korea. Too much may have been made of that, given that, in any formal review, all aspects of policy are scrutinized. When President-elect Donald Trump was told North Korea had claimed it had reached the “final stage of preparations to test-launch an intercontinental ballistic missile,” he tweeted, “It won’t happen.

” Kellyanne Conway, counselor to the president, explained that Trump had sent a “clear warning” to North Korea and put Pyongyang “on notice.” She added that “the president of the United States will stand between them and missile capabilities.” Shortly after taking office, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said the era of “strategic patience”—the Obama administration phrase for its policy—with the North was over.

And even though McMaster said every option “short of war” was being considered, he also said a nuclear-capable North Korea “is unacceptable [and] so, the president has asked us to be prepared to give him a full range of options to remove that threat to the American people and to our allies and partners in the region." His use of the word “remove” seemed to imply a use of force, and made the governments in Seoul, Tokyo and Beijing nervous.

Women escape as they cover their mouths and noses against smoke during an anti-terrorism drill against possible attacks in Seoul, South Korea, on September 29, 2009. Lee Jin-man/AP Has President Trump drawn a red line to use all means necessary to prevent North Korea from completing its ICBM program? Or is he doing a “madman across the water” bluff in order to spook North Korea, and instill some panic in the Chinese, hoping to prod them into using their economic leverage (85 percent of North Korea’s external trade is with the China) to rein in Kim? Former CIA analyst Klingner notes that, given the rapid pace of North Korea’s 2016 test program and the regime’s tendency to test a new president early, it might not be long before President Trump gets reports of another North Korean long-range missile or nuclear test.

This is when things could get very perilous. Another missile test does not constitute a crisis of the sort that should trigger another Korean War. It would, if anything, give the U.S. more leverage with China to tighten the economic noose around Pyongyang. Yet all the chatter about pre-emption—some of which has also come from Seoul—has prompted the DPRK leadership to issue its own threats about pre-emption.

In a recent report widely read in the Pentagon and intelligence community, Klingner argued that the talk about pre-emption, and declarations that all options are on the table, needs to stop. “Advocacy of pre-emption both by North Korea and by the U.S. and its allies is destabilizing,” he wrote, and could lead to greater potential for either side to miscalculate. Pyongyang may not realize that the more it demonstrates and threatens to use its nuclear prowess, the more likely allied action becomes during a crisis.

“Each side could misinterpret the other’s intentions, thus fueling tension, intensifying a perceived need to escalate, and raising the risk of miscalculation, including pre-emptive attack. Even a tactical military incident on the Korean Peninsula always has the potential for escalating to a strategic clash. With no apparent off-ramp on the highway to a crisis, the danger of a military clash on the Korean Peninsula is again rising.

” That is where we are now. Instead of making threats, say several current and former diplomats, intelligence analysts and military officers, reducing tensions now requires the steady, quiet deployment of additional military hardware to the region; and a behind the scenes application of Chinese diplomatic muscle from what many analysts believe to be an increasingly exasperated Beijing. Those are the things that may get Kim Jong Un’s head straight.

One miscalculation away from the next Korean War is way too close to for anyone’s comfort. Correction: A previous version of this story said that "the South’s armed forces, though far better trained and equipped than the North’s, consist of 660,000 men, more than 300,000 smaller than the South’s." We might 300,000 smaller than the North's armed forces. 

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← 2016 2015 2014 2017 inNorth Korea → 2018 2019 2020 Centuries: 20th 21st Decades: 1990s 2000s 2010s See also: Other events of 2017Years in North KoreaTimeline of Korean history2017 in South Korea In the year 2017, North Korea was involved in the 2017 North Korea crisis,[1] along with other events. The country conducted a nuclear test in September, and several missile tests throughout the year.

One of these was the country's first successful test of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), Hwasong-14. Two missiles were launched over Hokkaido in the Japanese archipelago, in August and in September 2017. Incumbents Premier: Pak Pong-ju Supreme leader: Kim Jong-un Events Note that the dates mostly reflect the publication of the news. News that span more than one day are usually listed according to the earliest day the event begun or was reported, or, they are listed by month but not by day.

January North Korea South Korea and International Jan 1: Kim Jong-Un makes his fifth New Year’s Day speech.[2][3][4] Jan 1: Kim Jong Un said his country is in the “last stage” of preparations to test-fire an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM).[5][6][7][8] Jan 11: S.K. white paper reports that N.K. has 50 kg of weapons-grade plutonium.[9] Jan 18: N.K. distributes new manual on broad photography restrictions to foreign diplomats.

[10] Jan 18: Following Kim Jong Un’s New Year’s Day Address outline, a N.K. government conference on implementing the tasks for reunification is held in Pyongyang.[11] Jan 18: S.K. and other intelligence agencies deem a N.K. ICBM test more likely in the short term.[12] Two new ICBM models seem to have been detected by foreign intelligence agencies.[13] Jan 18: Recent satellite imagery suggests that Yongbyon Nuclear Scientific Research Center, which reprocesses plutonium, may have resumed operations.

[14][15][16] 2008 photograph of the Yongbyon 5MWe Magnox reactor Jan 23: A new bridge is under construction between China’s Tumen City and N.K.’s Namyang City. The bridge is near Rason Port and Chongjin Port, two gateways used by China.[17] Jan 25: Satellite imagery confirms Chinese oil rig in N.K's exclusive economic zone (EEZ). In 2015 imagery had already revealed another one.[18] Jan 30: N.

K. is reported to be strengthening its measures to limit defections across the border with China, by using more unmanned detection devises, more including infrared cameras.[19] Jan 30: Russian and N.K. officials sign a memorandum of understanding on a program to train North Korean students in the field of railway transport at Russian universities.[20] Jan: U.S. provides humanitarian aid to N.K. for the first time since 2011, despite nuclear tensions.

[21] Jan 1: The United States condemns N.K.’s claims it will test-fire an intercontinental ballistic missile and warned Pyongyang against “provocative actions.”[22] Jan 2: S. Korean Navy conducts new year maritime drill amid N.K. threats.[23] Jan 4: China reportedly lifts ban on N.K.'s coal, its largest export. The ban had been imposed in compliance with UN Security Council resolution 2321 in reaction to N.

K.'s fifth nuclear test.[24] The U.N. launches a new website section to monitor N.K. coal exports, designed to increase accountability and UNSC resolutions compliance among U.N. member states.[25][26][27] Jan 5: S.K. begins conducting investigations of N.K. human rights violations in compliance with a new law, to build a database of N.K. rights violators.[28] Jan 6: S.K. accuses China of retaliating against South Korea's planned deployment of THAAD deployment (U.

S. anti-missile defense system for mid-range missiles; North Korea mid-range missiles could reach any part of South Korea, and some parts of Japan).[29][30][31][32][33][34] These include economic retaliations,[31][32][35] as well as canceling seven joint military events between S.K. and China.[36][37][38][39] Example of a Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) interceptors being launched during a test - US Army.

THAAD is designed to intercept medium-range missiles Jan 10: A sea-based U.S. military radar leaves Hawaii to monitor for potential North Korean intercontinental ballistic missile test launches.[40][41] Jan 11: N.K. had recently hacked several S.K. government agencies, defectors, analysts, NGOs, and companies.[42][43][44][45] Jan 16: China increases pressure to dissuade S.K. from deploying THAAD, and it becomes a divisive electoral issue in S.

K.[46][47][48][32] Jan 17: Japan to launch a missile defense satellite (Kirameki No. 2) to upgrade the country's surveillance network that can detect and track North Korea missile launches.[49] Jan 24: S.K.'s Ministry of Unification launches an advisory body to help the government set up its policy on N.K.'s human rights, in accordance with a new law aimed at improving the way N.K. treats its people.

[50][51] Jan 25: China releases a new, comprehensive list of goods that can not be exported to N.K., including dual-use.[52][53][54] Jan 25: Transparency International ranks N.K. as world's third most corrupt nation.[55][56][57] Jan 26: Following accusations of non-compliance with UN-imposed sanctions, China claims that it is enforcing sanctions against importing coal from N.K.[58][27] Jan 29: U.S President Trump expressed his “ironclad” commitment to the continued defense of S.

K. against N.K., in a phone conversation with S.K. acting president. This pronouncement comes after months of Trump's candidacy stirring uncertainty as to his policies towards U.S.' East-Asian allies.[59][60][34] February North Korea South Korea and International Feb 3: General Kim Won Hong, head of state security, was dismissed on charges of corruption and abuse of power.[61][62][63] Feb 11: N.K.

test-fires a new intermediate-range ballistic missile, the Pukkuksong-2, continuing to develop its rocket technology, in defiance of the international community's opposition.[64][65][66]In contrast to older, liquid-fueled rockets that take hours to prepare for launch and are easier to detect counteract by other countries, the Pukkuksong-2 is a solid-fuel rocket that can be launched in minutes.[67][68] Feb 17: N.

K. reacts to Malaysian inquiries on Kim Jong-nam's murder investigation, by accusing the Malaysian government to plot against N.K., and relations become strained. Both countries recall their respective ambassadors.[69][70] Feb 20: N.K. repeatedly refuses to confirm the identity of the deceased Kim Jong-nam,[71] or to cooperate in the murder's investigations. It requests the body, and protests Malaysia conducting an autopsy.

[69] Feb 27: A U.N. panel of experts in its annual review, reports that N.K. has been partnering with at least seven African nations to train soldiers, build infrastructure and sell a wide range of weapons and vehicles.[72][73]It also concluded that N.K. is “flouting” UN sanctions by trading in prohibited goods with evasion techniques that are increasing in scale, scope and sophistication, mostly via China.

[74] Feb 1: Freedom House ranks N.K. among the worst violators of human rights in the world.[75] Feb 2: A top official of the new U.S. administration (Defense Secretary Jim Mattis) visits South Korea and Japan for the first time since the beginning of the U.S. new administration, reaffirming the strong alliances, emphasizing protection against N.K's nuclear threat.[34][76][77][78][79] U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis meets with ROK National Security Advisor Kim Kwan-jin during a visit to Seoul, South Korea, Feb.

02, 2017. Feb 2: The interim S.K. government and U.S. reaffirm their intent to push ahead with the deployment the THAAD missile defense system. Opposition leaders in Seoul continue opposing the THAAD as they say it would do little to defend South Korea from the North’s plentiful short-range missiles but would anger China.[33][34][76][77][78][35] Feb 11: North Korea's missile test of Feb 11 was of a lower range than first feared after Kim Jong-un's pronouncements on early January;[8][80][81][82] the test turned not to be of a long-range missile (ICBM), but just an intermediate range.

[64][65]The test happened while Japanese prime minister Abe and U.S. president Trump were meeting. Trump pledged continued support for Japan, and said little about N.K., displaying unusual restraint.[64][65][83] Feb 13: UN Security Council unanimously condemns N.K.'s missile test[67][84] Feb 14: Kim Jong-nam, eldest son of Kim Jong-il and a half-brother of Kim Jong-un, is assassinated in an airport in Malaysia when two women expose him to a poison.

[85][86][69][87][88][89]Feb 15: The suspect women are arrested, and identified as Vietnamese and Indonesian. They claimed they were duped and thought they were just carrying out a joke.[69][86][90] The Police later reports that the women had practiced the attack at two malls.[88][89] Feb 15: Malaysia lists at least 11 suspects, including 6 North Korean citizens. A senior North Korean diplomat is also wanted for questioning, but N.

K. refuses.[86][90][88][91][92][89] Feb 17: South Korean reports that Kim Jong-nam's assassination could be conducted by North Korea, prompt Malaysian officials to deepen their investigation.[69][87][86][88][91][92] Feb 23: Kim Jong-nam's autopsy[93][92] reveals he died from exposure to VX nerve agent, the deadliest nerve agent ever synthesized, and labelled as a weapon of mass destruction that is banned under the Chemical Weapons Convention.

N.K. protests the autopsy being conducted and rejects its findings.[87][89] Mar 1: Analysts suggest that Kim Jong-nam might have been assassinated to deprive China of an alternative N.K. leader to replace Kim Jong-un.[94][95] Feb 18: China announces complete ban of coal imports from N.K. The ban will be in place until the end of the year, in an effort to curtail N.K.'s nuclear ambitions, and possibly as retaliation for the assassination of Kim Jong-nam, thought to have friendly ties to China.

[96][27][86][88][97][98][95]In recent years coal exports have accounted for about 40% of all N.K. international trade.[96] China had previously claimed compliance with the UNSC resolutions, but it allowed some exemptions and deliveries continued.[96][27][97] March North Korea South Korea and International Mar 3: North Korea has finished construction of a new hydropower plant in North Hwanghae Province.

[99] Mar 5: N.K. declares Malaysia’s ambassador persona non grata and had ordered him to leave.[100] North Korean Unha-3 rocket at launch pad, Sohae Satellite Launching Station, from where the latest launch-test may have happened Mar 6: N.K. launches four ballistic missiles. The missiles took off from Tongchang-ri, in the Northwest, and some flew 620 miles before falling into the sea between N.

K. and Japan.[101][102] The move prompted US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to embark on a diplomatic mission ten days later to Japan, South Korea and China, in an effort to resolve the heightened international tension in the region[103][104] S.K. defense officials later said the projectiles were Scud-ER ballistic missiles with a 620-mile range.[105][66] Mar 7: N.K. bans all Malaysians from leaving its soil, as retaliations escalate over diplomatic rift after Kim Jong-nam's death.

[106]Mar 9: N.K. allows two Malaysian employees of the United Nations' World Food Program to leave the country, while 9 remain retained.[107] Mar 10: Commercial satellite imagery reveals that N.K. is continuing to excavate a tunnel at its Punggye-ri nuclear test site, which may support an explosion up to 14 times more powerful than its last test.[108][109]While the 5th nuclear test (2016) was estimated as 15-20 kilotons, the site is now ready to test up to 282 kilotons.

[109] Mar 13: N.K. boycotts a U.N. review of its human rights record.[110] Mar 16: It is reported that the number of official markets in North Korea has been quickly growing (under the connivance of the authorities).[111] Mar 17: It is reported that Kim Jong-un instructed Ministry of State Security officials to refrain from threatening people in order to extort bribes. It is unclear why and how long this new policy will last.

[112] Mar 19: N.K. claims that it conducted a successful ground jet test of a newly developed high-thrust missile engine.[105] This could be progress towards developing an ICBM.[113] Mar 20: Some reports say that prices for market goods are fluctuating. This may be an indicator of the State's losing princing control, in favor of market forces.[114] March 22: N.K. fires a missile off its east coast on Wednesday, but the test apparently fails.

[105][66] Mar 23: In two among numerous recurrent statements, N.K. vows to continue to take nuclear deterrent steps against the U.S.' hard-line policy toward it.[115][116]In part N.K. says this is in response to South Korea-U.S. joint military drills taking place in March.[115][116] For the first time N.K. also said that it had been testing missile launch drills regularly, and that it would continue to do so.

[117] Mar 24: S.K. officials say that N.K. is all set for its 6th nuclear test.[118] Mar 25: More reports point to N.K. has been increasingly hacking numerous financial institutions. S.K. officials estimate that N.K.'s "hacking network is immense, encompassing a group of 1,700 hackers", which are based outside N.K. They are reported to have shifted the hacking focus to making money, attacking banks and private companies, apparently because the North’s other means of raising foreign currency are increasingly blocked under United Nations sanctions.

[119][120][121] Mar 1: S.K. and U.S. kick-off their annual, month long joint military training exercise involving ground, air and naval forces. N.K. hints it may react with more missile tests.[122][123] Mar 2: Malaysia scraps visa-free entry for North Koreans.[124] Mar 4: The New York Times reports that three years earlier, U.S. President Obama ordered Pentagon officials to intensify cyber and electronic strikes against North Korea’s missile program in hopes of sabotaging test launches in their opening seconds.

[125][126][105] Mar 4: The government of Malaysia expels North Korea’s ambassador, after a major break in diplomatic relations following the assassination of Kim Jong-nam.[127] The ambassador had made inflammatory accusations and had refused to be questioned in connection with Kim's death.[127][101] Mar 5: The S.K. Ministry of Unification announces plans to increase payment for N.K. defectors who provide valuable information concerning "national security".

[128] Mar 6: Deployment of the U.S. THAAD missile defense in S.K. is progressing, and China continues to protest and economically retaliate against S.K.[129][130][35][131][132] Mar 7: Chinese telecom equipment maker ZTE Corp agrees to plead guilty and pay nearly $900 million in a U.S. sanctions case.[133][134][135]A U.S. investigation found that ZTE conspired to evade U.S. embargoes by buying U.S. components, incorporating them into ZTE equipment and illegally shipping them to Iran.

In addition, it was charged in connection with 283 shipments of telecommunications equipment to N.K.[133][134][135] This was the largest civil penalty ever levied in a Commerce export control case. The investigation was triggered by Reuters' investigative journalism.[134][135] Mar 8: North Korean banks subject to international sanctions have recently been banned by Swift from using its global financial messaging service, after Swift was caught in violation of sanctions by the UN.

[136][137]Seven blacklisted North Korean banks had continued to use the Swift network in recent years despite the UN Security Council sanctions. Later, four had voluntarily withdrawn, leaving three banks identified as Bank of East Land, Korea Daesong Bank and Korea Kwangson Banking Corp. UN investigators uncovered evidence that the North Korean banks had continued to use Swift’s services despite being subjected to UN sanctions.

Upon publication of the UN report, Belgian authorities ordered Swift to ban those banks from using its services.[136][39][137] However, the tighter enforcement of these sanctions may be ineffectual if China continues to allow N.K. to move funds between the two countries.[136][39] Mar 14: The Wall Street Journal reported that despite U.S. sanctions four N.K. banks still remain connected with the international financial system through Swift.

[138][139]These banks are: Foreign Trade Bank, Kumgang Bank, Koryo Credit Development Bank, and North East Asia Bank.[138][139] The loophole was possible because Swift is required by law to comply with U.N. sanctions, but doesn't have to abide by U.S. law if its activities do not fall under U.S. jurisdiction, the report said.[138][139] Mar 13: After the one-year anniversary of the S.K.'s new North Korean Human Rights Law, its centerpiece North Korean Human Rights Foundation (designed to act as a bridge between the human rights NGOs and the Unification Ministry), is yet to be created due to political divisions.

[140] U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Address Reporters in Seoul Secretary Tillerson Poses for Photo With U.S. and ROK Forces During Visit to the Joint Security Area of the DMZ. Note that the foreground is S.K. territory, and the background N.K. territory Mar 15: Malaysia says DNA sample confirms murdered Kim Jong Nam's identity. N.K. accused of the murder, has denied the victim was Kim Jong Nam.

[141] Mar 16: Malaysia prepares to deport 50 North Koreans (out of a total of 315 staying in the country), detained by the government for overstaying their visas.[142] Mar 17: The U.S. Secretary of State visits Seoul.[105]He stated that two decades of international efforts to end the North’s nuclear weapons and missile programs had failed, and noted that "the policy of strategic patience has ended”.

[143] However, analysts doubt that other, new policy options are available. The policy in fact continues to consist of military deterrence, economic sanctions and diplomatic isolation.[144][145] He explicitly rejected any return to the bargaining table in an effort to buy time by halting North Korea’s accelerating testing program (continuing this same policy from Obama's administration). Negotiations “can only be achieved by denuclearizing, giving up their weapons of mass destruction,” he said — a step to which the North committed in 1992, and again in subsequent accords, but has always violated.

“Only then will we be prepared to engage them in talks.”[143] He warned that all options should be on the table to stop them, including possible pre-emptive military action “if they elevate the threat of their weapons program” to an unacceptable level.[105][143] Mar 19: The U.S. Secretary of State visits China. N.K. issues are prominent in talks, but no new agreements come out of it. Disagreements over THAAD continue, and China's economic retaliation for it against S.

K., continue.[146] Mar 22: It is reported that the U.S. is investigating N.K.'s possible role in the theft of $81 million from the central bank of Bangladesh in 2016, in what security officials fear could be a new front in cyberwarfare.[120] Mar 24:The UN Human Rights Council adopts a resolution to authorize the use of criminal justice experts to devise legal strategies for eventual prosecutions of violations by NK.

This follows an in-depth 2014 human rights report that recommended prosecution. Actual prosecution remains uncertain.[147][148][149] Mar 30: Kim Jong-nam’s body is released by Malaysia to N.K. Negotiations between the two countries also resulted a reduction of diplomatic tensions, the release of the 9 Malaysian citizens retained in N.K., and N.K. citizens in Malaysia also being allowed to travel to their home country.

[150][151] April North Korea South Korea and International Apr 2: Report indicates that Pyongyang is seeing a construction boom of skyscrapers and apartment buildings.[152] Apr 4: N.K. test-fires another intermediate range ballistic missile, a day before a U.S.-China summit.[153][154][66] Apr 6: N.K. called the U.S. strike on Syria an "intolerable act of aggression against a sovereign state", and said the strike showed it was justified in bolstering its own defenses.

[155] Participants in a prior edition of the Pyongyang Marathon, running past the Arch of Triumph Apr 9: N.K. holds its annual international marathon in Pyongyang.[156] Apr 11: N.K. announces its readiness to declare war on the U.S. after the country previously stated that they felt threatened as U.S. military forces approach the Korean Peninsula.[157] Apr 12: New satellite images suggest that N.

K. might soon conduct another underground detonation in its effort to learn how to make nuclear arms, it would be its 6th test.[158][159]Estimates that N.K. may soon test a nuclear device are strengthened by the proximity to April 15, a national day in N.K. that commemorates the birth of Kim Il-sung, and that in prior years has been highlighted with a nuclear test or missile test.[159] A ballistic missile Tank Example of a military parade from the North Korea Victory Day (celebrated on July 27) in 2013, and 2015 respectively.

Apr 15: N.K. celebrates the Day of the Sun, 105th birthday of Kim’s grandfather, the country’s founder-president, Kim Il Sung. In a major military parade in Pyongyang, N.K. displayed its long-range missiles.[160] N.K. does not carry out another nuclear test or ballistic missile launch, against widespread speculation that it would seek to do so on this day.[161] Apr 16: N.K. attempts to launch a ballistic missile test from its east coast, but fails.

[162][163][66] Apr 29: N.K. tests another missile, which also fails shortly after launch.[164][66] Apr 5: U.S. Treasury issued an alert to financial institutions about the results of an intergovernmental meeting that blacklisted North Korea as a money laundering concern. The alert follows a measure taken by the Treasury's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network in 2016, that identified North Korea as a jurisdiction of money laundering concern under the USA Patriot Act.

[165] Apr 5: China arrests South Korean pastors for helping North Koreans flee the regime.[166] Apr 5: U.S. Secretary of States react's to N.K. latest missile test with a brief a cryptic statement: "North Korea launched yet another intermediate range ballistic missile. The United States has spoken enough about North Korea. We have no further comment.".[167] In a phone call to prime minister Shinzo Abe, U.

S. president Trump promises to boost US military capabilities after Pyongyang fired ballistic missile.[168] Apr 6: Mongolia deregisters more North Korean vessels, following UN Security Council Resolution 2321.[169] Apr 6: U.S. bombs Syria to punish the regime's use of chemical weapons.[170] It is also seen as the Trump administration signaling N.K. its willingness to use military force to compel N.

K. to stop its development of nuclear bombing capabilities.[155] Apr 7: China and U.S. leaders Trump and Xi meet. Trump seeks Xi's cooperation in dealing with N.K., but states he is prepared to act alone. No specific commitments resulted from this meeting.[171][159] Apr 8: The U.S. announces the rerouting of the Carl Vinson Strike Group (consisting of an aircraft carrier and other warships) from its original planned route from Singapore to Australia, to the West Pacific, near the Korean Peninsula.

[155][172][159]This is in response to N.K.'s recent nuclear and missile tests, which the U.S. calls "The number one threat in the region",[155] and discourage further tests.[158] There are also recent indications from North Korea that it may about to test an intercontinental missile.[155][172][158] April 11: Reacting to worries and conjecture spreading in S.K. of a possible pre-emptive American military strike on nuclear-armed N.

K., the government sought to reassure citizens that there would be no such attack without its consent.[173] Apr 12: China orders its military to be on nationwide alert and ready to move, in areas North Korea border, as tensions escalate on the peninsula.[174] Apr 12: China's leader Xi calls U.S. President Trump to advocate for a "peaceful resolution" in tensions with N.K.[175] Apr 13: Trump warns N.

K. to back down from an soon-expected nuclear test. Trump’s remark are taken as a threat of military action against the North.[159] Apr 14: The Chinese government is reported to be strengthening its diplomatic efforts to defuse tensions between N.K. and the U.S.[159] China’s foreign minister Wang Yi states that “The United States and South Korea and North Korea are engaging in tit for tat, with swords drawn and bows bent, and there have been storm clouds gathering”.

[176] Photograph of USS Carl Vinson on April 15, 2017, published by the U.S. Navy, showing the aircraft carrier crossing the Sunda Strait, sailing in the opposite direction to the Korean Peninsula.[177][178] Apr 18: It is revealed that when the Carl Vinson carrier group was announced on April 8 to be heading to the Korean peninsula as a deterrent to N.K., due to a "glitch-ridden sequence of events" it was actually heading in the opposite direction.

Finally, it did change course and start heading there, with an arrival expected a week later.[177][178] May North Korea South Korea and International May 3: N.K. confirms the detention of Tony Kim during a visit to Pyongyang. He is an American teacher at Yanbian University of Science and Technology.[179] May 13: N.K. launches an intermediate range missile, the first after the South's elections. It was launched from Kusong.

[180] N.K. claimed the missile was capable of carrying a nuclear head.[181][66] May 21: N.K. fires a medium-range ballistic missile.[182] It was launched from near Pukchang.[182][66] May 28: N.K. fired another missile, flying 280 miles, and landing on the sea, inside Japan’s economic zone waters.[183][66] May 2: U.S. antimissile system (Terminal High Altitude Area Defense, or THAAD) in South Korea becomes operational.

[184] New ROK president Moon Jae-in, in May 2017 May 10: South Korea elects new president, Moon Jae-in. He announces a change of policy towards N.K., towards more engagement, reminiscent of the sunshine policy.[185]The election followed after President Park Geun-hye was removed from office due to an alleged corruption scandal.[185] May 12: A global cyberattack affects thousands of computers and organizations worldwide.

The hackers used a tool stolen from the U.S.' National Security Agency.[186]May 22: Suspicions mount that the attack may have originated from North Korea.[187] Similarities are found with the 2014 Sony Pictures hack.[187] May 30: U.S. conducts a successful missile defense test.[188] A re-engineered American interceptor rocket collided with a mock intercontinental ballistic missile over the Pacific Ocean.

[188] June North Korea South Korea and International Jun 5: N.K. showcases fighter jets and helicopters in annual air contest.[189] Jun 8: N.K has fired four anti-ship missiles off its east coast, near the port city of Wonsan. Jun 13: N.K. releases U.S. citizen Otto Warmbier, detained 17 months earlier while visiting the country with a tourist group. He is reported to be in a coma.[190]Jun 19: Warmbier, who had sustained a catastrophic brain injury shortly after his conviction in N.

K., dies seven days after his return to the U.S.[191] President Donald J. Trump welcomes President Moon Jae-in to the White House Jun 7: S.K. President Moon Jae-in suspends further THAAD deployment pending a review, after discovering four addition launchers had entered S.K. without the defense ministry informing him.[192][193] Jun 18: N.K. protests the seizure by U.S. Homeland Security of a package carried by N.

K. citizens that were about to take a flight from New York. N.K. nor the U.S. explained the contents of the package, but the U.S. stated that those citizens did not have diplomatic immunity.[194]Jun 20: The package is returned to N.K.[195] Jun 30: S.K. President Moon Jae-in met with U.S. President Trump. The latter reaffirmed the American security alliance with S.K. against the threat of a nuclear-armed N.

K. But he showed little patience for Mr. Moon’s hope for engagement with the North — something analysts said could be a future source of friction between the leaders.[196] July North Korea South Korea and International Jul 4: N.K. successfully conducts its first test of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), named Hwasong-14.[197]This is a milestone in its efforts to build a nuclear weapon capable of reaching the United States mainland.

The ICBM was launched from Kusong.[197] Jul 28: N.K. launches a second Hwasong-14 ICBM which flew for 45 minutes with an apogee of 3725 km and traveled 998 km, landing in Japanese waters.[198][66] Jul 19: Activists affiliated with the Transitional Justice Working Group (a human rights group based in Seoul), announce findings identifying more than 300 sites in N.K. where executions are thought to have occurred and 47 sites believed to have hosted cremations and burials.

[199][200] Jul 20: Recent media reports indicate that N.K.’s sole SINPO-class experimental ballistic missile submarine (SSBA) has been engaged in unusual deployment activity’ over the past 48 hours, sailing approximately 100-km out from Sinpo into the East Sea (Sea of Japan). [201]If correct, this would be the submarine’s longest known voyage to date.[201] While there are several possible explanations, the most likely is preparations for a test in the near future of an updated Pukkuksong-1 (KN-11) submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) or a potentially newer system.

[201] Jul 3: The New York Times reports that U.S. President Trump is "frustrated by China’s unwillingness to lean on North Korea" to halt its nuclear development program.[202]Efforts by Trump to soften its position on China-U.S. relations did not bear fruit. Instead, the U.S. administration hardened its approach by: Selling weapons to Taiwan; blacklisting multiple Chinese banks and companies that do business with N.

K.; labeling China one of the worst offenders in an annual State Department report on human trafficking; and by the U.S. Navy asserting freedom of navigation by a destroyer sailing near disputed territory claimed by China in the South China Sea.[202] Jul 28: President Moon orders talks with U.S. to deploy more THAAD units after North Korea ICBM test[203] Jul 29: ROK and US fired missiles in response to the test.

August North Korea South Korea and International Aug 7: In a Southeast Asian diplomatic meeting, N.K. Foreign Minister Ri Yong-ho conducts a round of multiparty bargaining sessions with his counterparts from China, South Korea and Russia, for the first time in 8 years. The meetings did not seem to yield any results.[204] Aug 26: N.K. fires several short-range missiles from its east coast, landing in the Sea of Japan.

[205][206]The launches occurred during a period of escalating tensions between Pyongyang and Washington. American and South Korean forces began twice-yearly war games six days earlier, aimed at preparing for a possible attack by the North.[205] This was the 12th missile test by N.K. in 2017.[66] Aug 29: N.K. fires a ballistic missile.[207]Unlike prior tests, this missile flew over Japan. It was launched from the vicinity of Pyongyang, flew for 1,700 miles, and splashed in the Pacific hundreds of miles off the eastern coast of Japan.

[207] The missile was at an altitude in excess of 400 kilometres (250 mi) over Japan.[208][207]While there is no international treaty that clarifies the upper limits of the national airspace of countries, as a point of reference the U.S. considers anyone who has flown above 50 miles (80 km) to be an astronaut; with descending space shuttles have flown closer than 80 km over other nations without requesting permission first.

[209] Example of a UN Security Council meeting. The image is of an April 28 meeting chaired by U.S. Secretary Tillerson, on Denuclearization of the DPRK Aug 5: The UN Security Council unanimously adopts resolution 2371, toughening economic sanctions on N.K.[210] This is the sixth tightening of sanctions since the UN first imposed them in 2006.[211] 2013 picture of the US-ROK annual joint exercise called Key Resolve.

The image shows ROK Special Warfare Flotilla and U.S. SEAL Team 17 preparing to conduct a visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) Aug 8: N.K.’s rapidly advancing nuclear program is prompting politicians in Japan and S.K. to push for the deployment of more powerful weapons, in what could lead to a regional arms race.[212] Aug 21: The US and S.K. begin their annual joint military exercises, while N.

K. warns that the drills would deepen tensions.[213] Aug 8: U.S. President Trump, in a statement considered improvised and bombastic but also surprising, asserts he will meet further provocations and threats to the U.S. “with fire and fury like the world has never seen”.[211][214] Aug 14: Experts estimate that N.K.’s recent success in testing an ICBMs that appears able to reach the U.S. was made possible by black-market purchases of powerful rocket engines probably from a Ukrainian factory with historical ties to Russia’s missile program.

[215][216]A 2014 report by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace had forewarned of that risk.[215][217] Aug 29: In reaction to N.K.'s launch of a missile that flies over the Hokkaido island in northern Japan, the Japanese government sends a text alert to its citizens about the launch and advises them to take protective cover.[207] Aug 29: Japan's Prime Minister Abe, who has long pursued to modifying its constitution, end the country's pacifist policy, and be able boost the military might, gains more support due to N.

K. belligerence.[218][212] Aug 30: The New York Times reports how experts on N.K. see the country angling "to bring the danger and tension to a crescendo, and then to pivot to a peace proposal" that U.S. President Trump may unexpectedly accept and make large concessions in the process.[219]To N.K., the U.S. can offer a peace treaty, diplomatic recognition, the easing of decades-old sanctions and the withdrawal of American troops from S.

K., which Pyongyang considers its existential threat.[220] September North Korea South Korea and International Sep 3: N.K. claims it has developed a more advanced nuclear weapon that has “great destructive power”, and that leader Kim Jong-un has inspected a hydrogen bomb that will be loaded on to a new intercontinental ballistic missile.[221][222]This announcement is made hours before an underground nuclear test.

[221] Graphic from the United States Geological Survey showing the location of seismic activity at the time of the test, which caused an earthquake of 6.3-magnitude. Sep 3: N.K. conducts another underground nuclear test.[223] This was N.K's 6th nuclear test since its first one a decade earlier.[224]The underground blast was by far North Korea’s most powerful ever. Experts estimated that the blast was of about 140 kilotons,[225] or 4 to 16 times more powerful than any the North had set off before, making experts wonder whether the North had set off a thermonuclear bomb.

[224] The explosion caused tremors that were felt in South Korea and China.[224] The news of the test were first revealed by seismic authorities that detected an artificial earthquake near the Pyongyang regime’s known nuclear test site.[223] Shortly after the test, N.K. claimed that it had indeed tested successfully a hydrogen bomb, which involved a “two-stage thermonuclear weapon”, capable of being loaded on to an intercontinental ballistic missile.

[226][227][228][229] Sep 4: S.K. officials said that they had seen evidence that North Korea may be preparing another test, likely of an intercontinental ballistic missile.[230][231][226] Sep 15: N.K. test-launches another missile that flies over Japan.[232][1]The missile flew over Japan and landed in the sea some 1,200 miles east of Hokkaido.[1] Sep 25: N.K.'s foreign minister states that Trump’s comments suggesting he would eradicate N.

K. and its leaders are “a declaration of war.”[233][234]He also asserts that his country has the right to defend itself by shooting down U.S. planes, even if they are not in the country’s airspace.[233][234] N.B.: For historical perspective note that N.K. has made similar bellicose remarks in the past. For example, in 2013 N.K. declared void the Korean Armistice (which effectively put an end to the Korean War of 1950-1953).

[235] Sep 28: 38 North reports that satellite imagery from September 1 and 21, indicate that N.K. continues to work on its second submersible ballistic missile test stand barge at the Nampo Navy Shipyard.[236] Sep 1: President Vladimir Putin warns President Donald Trump not apply too much pressure on North Korea's nuclear program, saying the strained relationship between the two countries was “on the verge of a large-scale conflict.

”[237] Sep 3: North Korea’s detonation of a sixth nuclear bomb on Sunday prompted the Trump administration to warn that even the threat to use such a weapon against the United States and its allies “will be met with a massive military response."[224] Sep 3: S.K. carries out a simulated attack on N.K.’s nuclear test site in a huge show of force in response to Pyongyang’s detonation of what it claims is a hydrogen bomb.

[226]Seoul has also approved the complete deployment of a US anti-missile system in another sign that it intends to address North Korean provocations with reminders of its own military firepower, while keeping the door open to dialogue.[226] The army and air force drills, held at an undisclosed location on Monday morning, involved launching ballistic missiles in a simulated strike against N.K.’s Punggye-ri nuclear test site – the scene of Sunday’s controlled detonation of what Pyongyang claimed was a powerful hydrogen bomb capable of being loaded on to an intercontinental ballistic missile.

[226] Sep 4: U.S. ambassador to the U.N. told the Security Council that Kim Jong-un “is begging for war”, and adding “the time has come for us to exhaust all of our diplomatic means before it’s too late.”[231] Sep 6: The U.S. circulates a draft resolution at the U.N., seeking a full authorization for interdiction of N.K. ships in international waters. Such authorization could result in forceful interdiction and lead to escalations, a risk reminiscent to the Cuban missile crisis.

The draft resolution also seeks to impose a full oil embargo.[238] Sep 11: The UN Security Council unanimously ratchets up sanctions again against N.K.[239]These sanctions fall significantly short of the far-reaching penalties that the Trump administration had demanded, having had to compromise with China and Russia to gain their support:[239]The resolution only sets a cap on oil exports to N.K. The U.

S. had originally wanted a complete cutoff, but China has long worried that such a drastic measure would lead to N.K.’s collapse.[239] It asks all countries to inspect ships going in and out of North Korea’s ports (a provision put in place by the Security Council in 2009) but does not authorize the use of force for ships that do not comply (the U.S. wanted authorization to use force).[239] It imposes requirements, but does not ban, the import of North Korean laborers.

[239] Sep 15: S.K plans donate $8 million to two United Nations humanitarian programs in N.K., but Japan's government asks S.K. to reconsider the aid in light of N.K. latest missile test.[240] Sep 15: U.S. ambassador to the U.N. hinted to N.K. that military options might be on the table if U.N. sanctions do not deter the regime from advancing its nuclear program.[241] Sep 19: In his speech to the U.

N. General Assembly, Trump vows to “totally destroy” N.K. if it threatens the U.S. or its allies.[242] Sep 20: Trump signs executive order 13810 to expand U.S. sanctions on N.K.[243][244][245][246]It enhances Treasury Department authorities to target individuals who provide goods, services or technology to N.K.[243][244][245][246] Sep 23: American warplanes fly close to the N.K.'s coast, going farther north of the Demilitarized Zone than any other American air mission for the last two decades.

[247][234]The Air Force advertised the exercise, as a direct response to N.K.’s accelerated missile launches and a nuclear test two weeks earlier.[247][234] Sep 24: The U.S. government establishes a travel ban into the U.S., on the citizens of several countries, including of N.K.[248][249][250]The Trump administration argues the ban's purpose is to enhance security, and in the case of N.K. the ban is specifically imposed because "North Korea does not cooperate with the United States Government in any respect and fails to satisfy all information-sharing requirements".

[248][249][250] Sep 30: U.S. Trump administration acknowledges for the first time that it is in direct communication with N.K, over its missile and nuclear tests.[251]Oct 1: However, one day later Trump calls the U.S. Secretary of State's diplomatic efforts a waste of time.[252] October North Korea South Korea and International Oct 1: Italy becomes fifth country to expel N.K. ambassador, in response to N.

K.'s continued pursuit of its nuclear weapons program.[253]The other four countries that recently expelled the N.K. ambassador were Spain, Mexico, Peru and Kuwait.[253] Oct 1: It is revealed that the August 11, 2016 seizure of 30,000 grenades from N.K., by Egyptian customs authorities, were actually bought by Egypt itself, against the UN sanctions imposed on North Korean arms trade. [254][255]After the seizure, the Jie Shun was taken to Al Adabiyah port, berthed there on Aug 27, 2016.

Since then and as of Oct 2 2017, the ship stopped transmitting its Automatic identification system.[254][255] November North Korea South Korea and International Nov 29: N.K. test-launches another intercontinental ballistic missile, which flies for about 1,000km (620 miles) and falls into the Sea of Japan.[256]It is the 3rd ICBM test, and the 6th missile test, carried by N.K. this year.[256] Nov 20: U.

S. President Donald Trump announces re-listing North Korea as a State Sponsor of Terrorism.[257][258]S.K.'s foreign ministry said it sees the decision "as part of the international community's joint efforts to take N.K. to the path of denuclearization."[259] The U.S. put N.K. on the terror sponsor list in 1988, after North Korean agents blew up a S.K. civilian airliner, killing 115 people. But Pyongyang was removed in 2008 after they met benchmarks related to a nuclear disarmament deal.

[259] Returning North Korea to the terror list would mean it is subject to greater restrictions on U.S. foreign assistance, defense exports and sales, and other financial transactions.[259] Other North Korea's 2017 calendar has 71 public holidays, which is three more than in 2016.[260] N.K. participates in the Asian Winter Games, hosted in Japan.[261] See also 2017 DPR Korea League 2017 North Korean missile tests List of years in North Korea North Korea at the 2017 World Aquatics Championships North Korea at the 2017 World Championships in Athletics References ^ a b c Goldman, Russell (September 15, 2017).

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^ a b Ji, Dagyum (January 20, 2017). "McCain accuses China of "hypocrisy" over THAAD trade reprisals - S.Korea finance ministry to set up task force to determine response to China's import bans". NK News. USA. Archived from the original on January 24, 2017. Retrieved January 23, 2017. ^ a b c Lee, Jenny (January 23, 2017). "South Korea Reaffirms THAAD Deployment Despite Growing Opposition". Voice of America.

USA. Archived from the original on January 30, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. ^ a b "ELEMENTS - Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD)". USA: U.S. Department of Defense - Missile Defense Agency. Archived from the original on February 19, 2017. Retrieved February 20, 2017. The Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) element provides the Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) with a globally-transportable, rapidly-deployable capability to intercept and destroy ballistic missiles inside or outside the atmosphere during their final, or terminal, phase of flight.

^ a b c d Gordon, Michael R.; Choe, Sang-Hun (February 2, 2017). "Jim Mattis, in South Korea, Tries to Reassure an Ally". The New York Times. USA. Archived from the original on February 9, 2017. Retrieved February 20, 2017. ^ a b c Lee, Hee Ok (March 2, 2017). "THAAD: A Critical Litmus Test for South Korea-China Relations". 38 North, U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University's Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies.

USA. Archived from the original on March 2, 2017. Retrieved March 7, 2017. The decision to deploy THAAD has, in fact, severely damaged relations between China and South Korea, countries that have generally seen eye to eye on the North Korean nuclear issue. When North Korea conducted its fourth nuclear test in January 2016, China issued a statement strongly condemning the North.[2] Despite that, the ROK proceeded on February 7, 2016 to begin official consultations with the United States on THAAD deployment.

China fought the proposal from the start, contending that the potential step would violate its security interests and disrupt the strategic balance. China regularly voiced its criticism of the prospective deployment in even stronger terms, expressing hope that it would be “relinquished,” warning that it would “wreck” bilateral relations and linking it to a “sword dance by the US aiming at China.

” When the ROK ultimately decided to deploy the system, China immediately said it had “expressed its strong dissatisfaction with and resolute opposition to the decision.” (...) South Korean companies have also found business and investment deals in China going sour, with numerous reports of increased inspections, stalled construction projects and difficulties clearing customs. Following the announcement of the recent land swap deal with Lotte International, exchanging Lotte’s golf course in the southeast for military land near Seoul, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Gen Shuang warned again, of “consequences” for the decision, stating that China “will definitely take measures to safeguard its security interests,” with “all the consequences entailed will be borne by the US and the Republic of Korea.

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Korea JoongAng Daily. South Korea. Archived from the original on January 18, 2017. Retrieved January 17, 2017. ^ Padden, Brian (January 16, 2017). "THAAD is Becoming a South Korean Election Issue". Voice of America. Archived from the original on January 18, 2017. Retrieved January 17, 2017. ^ JH, Ahn (January 23, 2017). "THAAD issue front and center as Minjoo candidates announce their bids - "Ahn-bama" and "Bernie Sanders of Korea" clash on ROK defense, diplomacy, and relations with Trump".

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Yonhap News. ROK. January 24, 2017. Archived from the original on January 30, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. ^ Kim, Seong Hwan (January 28, 2017). "Advisory committee for North Korean human rights policy launched". Daily NK. ROK. Archived from the original on January 28, 2017. Retrieved February 20, 2017. Four months after the implementation of the North Korean Human Rights Act, the North Korean Human Rights Advisory Committee has formed to provide policy guidance to improve human rights in North Korea.

(...) The North Korean Human Rights Advisory Committee will provide expert advice to the Ministry of Unification on the establishment of a basic plan to promote human rights in North Korea, as well as the operation of the North Korean Human Rights Foundation and the North Korean Human Rights Documentation Center. Initially, the Committee was scheduled to be launched shortly after the implementation of the North Korean Human Rights Act in September last year, but the launch was postponed due to a delay imposed by the opposition party on its recommendations for committee members.

^ Wong, Sue-Lin; Birsel, Robert (January 25, 2017). "China gives details of items banned from export to North Korea". Reuters. Archived from the original on January 30, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. ^ Bodeen, Christopher  (January 26, 2017). "China releases new list of items banned for export to NKorea". The Washington Post. USA. Retrieved February 5, 2017. ^ Ji, Dagyum (January 26, 2017). "China releases new export ban list to N.

Korea, prohibits dual-use items - Commerce Ministry move in line with UNSC Resolution 2321". NK News. Washington, D.C, USA. Archived from the original on January 27, 2017. Retrieved February 20, 2017. ^ "N. Korea rated as world's third most corrupt nation". Yonhap News. ROK. January 25, 2017. Archived from the original on January 30, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. ^ "CORRUPTION PERCEPTIONS INDEX 2016".

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Retrieved June 9, 2017. "There are no signs of an imminent test firing of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) by North Korea. But we are closely monitoring any new military activities in the country as it could launch an IRBM at any time if leader Kim Jong-un gives the order," an official at the [South Korean] defense ministry said. ^ Baker, Peter (February 12, 2017). "Trump Responds to North Korean Missile Launch With Uncharacteristic Restraint".

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Retrieved February 25, 2017. The members of the Security Council strongly condemned the most recent ballistic missile launches conducted by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea on 11 February 2017 and 19 October 2016. These launches are in grave violation of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s international obligations under United Nations Security Council resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016) and 2321 (2016).

The members of the Security Council deplore all the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea ballistic missile activities, including these launches, noting that such activities contribute to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s development of nuclear weapons delivery systems and increase tension. The members of the Security Council further regretted that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea is diverting resources to the pursuit of ballistic missiles while Democratic People’s Republic of Korea citizens have great unmet needs.

(...) ^ Choe, Sang-hun; Gladstone, Rick (February 14, 2017). "Kim Jong-un's Half Brother Is Reported Assassinated in Malaysia". The New York Times. USA. Archived from the original on February 14, 2017. Retrieved February 14, 2017. ^ a b c d e Choe, Sang-hun; Paddock, Richard C. (February 15, 2017). "Kim Jong-nam, the Hunted Heir to a Dictator Who Met Death in Exile". The New York Times. USA. Archived from the original on February 16, 2017.

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^ a b c Choe, Sang-hun (February 18, 2017). "China Suspends All Coal Imports From North Korea". The New York Times. USA. Archived from the original on February 19, 2017. Retrieved February 25, 2017. China said on Saturday that it was suspending all imports of coal from North Korea as part of its effort to enact United Nations Security Council sanctions aimed at stopping the country’s nuclear weapons and ballistic-missile program.

The ban takes effect on Sunday and will last until the end of the year, the Chinese Commerce Ministry said in a brief statement posted on its website on Saturday. (...) Coal has accounted for 34 percent to 40 percent of North Korean exports in the past several years, and almost all of it was shipped to China, according to South Korean government estimates. ^ a b Haggard, Stephan (February 19, 2017).

"The Coal Ban: Has China Turned on North Korea?". Peterson Institute for International Economics. USA. Archived from the original on March 7, 2017. Retrieved March 6, 2017. ^ Meng, Meng; Mason, Josephine (February 20, 2017). "China steel mills caught on the hop by North Korea coal ban". Archived from the original on March 7, 2017. Retrieved March 6, 2017. ^ Byrne, Leo (March 3, 2017). "N. Korea completes hydro plant as part of UN project - Though construction time on the small power plant was slow".

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These launches are in grave violation of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s international obligations under United Nations Security Council resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016) and 2321 (2016). The members of the Security Council deplore all the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea ballistic missile activities, including these launches, noting that such activities contribute to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s development of nuclear weapons delivery systems and increase tension in the region and beyond ^ "North Korea: Four ballistic missiles fired into sea".

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"North Korea's Punggye-ri Nuclear Test Site: Analysis Reveals Its Potential for Additional Testing with Significantly Higher Yields". 38 North, U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University's Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies. USA. Archived from the original on 2017-08-19. Retrieved September 10, 2017. Commercial satellite imagery of the Punggye-ri Nuclear Test Site shows that substantial tunnel excavation is continuing at the “North” Portal (previously the “West” Portal), which provided support for the last four of the five declared underground nuclear tests conducted by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

The North Portal tunnels provide direct access under Mt. Mantap, where up to 800 meters of overlying rock is available for test containment. This locale provides the maximum overlying rock possible within the entire test site and is where the most recent and largest detected test occurred on September 9, 2016 (estimated at 15-20 kilotons yield). The continued tunneling under Mt. Mantap via the North Portal has the potential for allowing North Korea to support additional underground nuclear tests of significantly higher explosive yields, perhaps up to 282 kilotons (or just above a quarter of a megaton).

^ Nebehay, Stephanie (Mar 13, 2017). "North Korea boycotts "politically motivated" U.N. rights session". Reuters. Archived from the original on 2017-03-13. Retrieved April 2, 2017. ^ "No. of N. Korea's official markets increasing". Yonhap News Agency. South Korea. March 10, 2017. Archived from the original on 2017-09-11. Retrieved September 10, 2017. The number of official markets in North Korea has been on a rapid increase under the connivance of the authorities, a U.

S. broadcaster said Thursday."The number was recently confirmed to be 439 via an analysis of satellite images of the communist country by Curtis Melvin, a researcher at the US-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University in the United States, Radio Free Asia said. The figure was an increase of 40 from a year ago, with some 1-1.8 million people estimated to be using the markets. Markets in the North show an upward trend in their numbers and scale, which is more noticeable under the Kim Jong-un regime, the broadcaster said.

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^ a b "N.K. vows continued nuclear deterrent steps against U.S. hostile policy". Yonhap News Agency. South Korea. March 20, 2017. Archived from the original on 2017-05-06. Retrieved September 10, 2017. North Korea on Monday hinted at additional provocations by vowing that it will continue to take nuclear deterrent steps against the U.S.' hard-line policy toward it."Our army and people will continuously bolster up our nuclear deterrent for self defense down the road under the conditions that high-level U.

S. government officials adamantly stick to their hostile policy toward us," the Rodong Sinmun, a daily of the ruling Workers' Party, said in a commentary titled "The Root of Intensification of Tension on the Korean Peninsula." The possession of strong nuclear weapons is "the only way" to ultimately put North Korea-U.S. relations in order and "absolute collateral" for peace and security on the Korean Peninsula, the paper said.

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In its first reference to the country regularly launching missiles, North Korea is seen as hinting that it could conduct missile provocations down the road. "It was a normal drill that was aimed at countering nuclear war maneuvers staged by enemy forces including the U.S.," said the Rodong Sinmun, the country's main newspaper, referring to the country's firing of four ballistic missiles on March 6.

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The studies may solve the mystery of how North Korea began succeeding so suddenly after a string of fiery missile failures, some of which may have been caused by American sabotage of its supply chains and cyberattacks on its launches. After those failures, the North changed designs and suppliers in the past two years, according to a new study by Michael Elleman, a missile expert at the International Institute for Strategic Studies.

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The H-bomb test was carried out to examine and confirm the accuracy and credibility of the power control technology and internal structural design newly introduced into manufacturing H-bomb to be placed at the payload of the ICBM.(...) Symmetrical compression of nuclear charge, its fission detonation and high-temperature nuclear fusion ignition, and the ensuing rapidly boosting fission-fusion reactions, which are key technologies for enhancing the nuclear fusion power of the second-system of the H-bomb, were confirmed to have been realized on a high level.

The perfect success in the test of the H-bomb for ICBM clearly proved that the Juche-based nukes of the DPRK have been put on a highly precise basis, the creditability of the operation of the nuclear warhead is fully guaranteed and the design and production technology of nuclear weapons of the DPRK has been put on a high level to adjust its destructive power in consideration of the targets and purposes.

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S. Trade Tough Messages". The New York Times. USA. Retrieved September 25, 2017. ^ a b Shear, Michael D. (September 24, 2017). "New Order Indefinitely Bars Almost All Travel From Seven Countries". The New York Times. USA. Retrieved September 24, 2017. ^ a b Office of the Press Secretary (September 24, 2017). "President Donald J. Trump Strengthens Security Standards For Traveling to America". Washington, D.

C., USA: The White House. Retrieved September 24, 2017. ^ a b Office of the Press Secretary (September 24, 2017). "Fact Sheet: Proclamation on Enhancing Vetting Capabilities and Processes for Detecting Attempted Entry Into the United States by Terrorists or Other Public-Safety Threats". Washington, D.C., USA: The White House. Retrieved September 24, 2017. The government in North Korea does not cooperate with the United States Government in any respect and fails to satisfy all information-sharing requirements.

Accordingly, the entry into the United States of nationals of North Korea as immigrants and nonimmigrants is suspended. ^ Sanger, David E. (Sep 30, 2017). "U.S. in Direct Communication With North Korea, Says Tillerson". The New York Times. USA. Retrieved Sep 30, 2017. ^ Baker, Peter; Sanger, David E. (October 1, 2017). "Trump Says Tillerson Is 'Wasting His Time' on North Korea". The New York Times.

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Mail Online. Archived from the original on January 11, 2017. Retrieved 8 January 2017. ^ "(LEAD) N. Korean athletes welcomed at Asian Winter Games". Yonhap News Agency. ROK. February 18, 2017. Archived from the original on March 7, 2017. Retrieved March 6, 2017. External links Wikinews has news related to: North Korea UN Security Council Documents for DPRK (North Korea) (UNSC Resolutions and statements) UN Security Council Reports on the DPRK (North Korea) (UNSC Reports) UN Security Council Committee Established Pursuant to Resolution 1718 (2006) (Reports issued by the UN Panel of Experts, established to support of the Sanctions Committee in carrying out its mandate as specified in paragraph 12 of resolution 1718) Report on Human Rights Abuses or Censorship in North Korea, by U.

S. Department of State (January 11, 2017) (archived here) Kim Jong-un New Year's speech – YouTube v t e Years in North Korea (1948–present) 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1948 1949 v t e 2017 in Asia Sovereign states Afghanistan Armenia Azerbaijan Bahrain Bangladesh Bhutan Brunei Cambodia China Cyprus East Timor (Timor-Leste) Egypt Georgia India Indonesia Iran Iraq Israel Japan Jordan Kazakhstan North Korea South Korea Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Lebanon Malaysia Maldives Mongolia Myanmar Nepal Oman Pakistan Philippines Qatar Russia Saudi Arabia Singapore Sri Lanka Syria Tajikistan Thailand Turkey Turkmenistan United Arab Emirates Uzbekistan Vietnam Yemen States with limited recognition Abkhazia Artsakh Northern Cyprus Palestine South Ossetia Taiwan Dependencies and other territories British Indian Ocean Territory Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Hong Kong Macau Retrieved from "https://en.

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