Macbook Pro Retina 13 Screen Replacement Cost

Picture of Macbook Pro Retina 13 Screen Replacement Cost

Apple MacBook Pro "Core i5" 2.5 13" Retina 2012 Specs Identifiers: Retina Late 2012 - MD212LL/A* - MacBookPro10,2 - A1425 - 2557 All MacBook Pro Models | All 2012 Models | Dynamically Compare This Mac to Others Distribute This Page: Bookmark & Share | Download: PDF Manual Following in the footsteps of the 15-Inch "MacBook Pro with Retina Display" models, the 13-Inch Retina Display MacBook Pro line packs a beautiful high-resolution LED-backlit 13.

3" widescreen 2560x1600 (227 ppi) "retina" display in a case that weighs just a bit more than 3.5 pounds (1.62 kg).Unfortunately, also like the 15-Inch Retina Display MacBook Pro, the 13-Inch models use an essentially "sealed" design with RAM that is soldered in place and cannot be upgraded after purchase (and can not be upgraded even at the time of purchase), storage that is not intended to be upgraded after purchase, and a battery that is not intended to be replaced by end-users, either.

This specific model -- the MacBook Pro "Core i5" 2.5 13-Inch (Late 2012 Retina Display) features a 22 nm "Ivy Bridge" 2.5 GHz Intel "Core i5" processor (3210M), with dual independent processor "cores" on a single silicon chip, a 3 MB shared level 3 cache, 8 GB of onboard 1600 MHz DDR3L SDRAM (which cannot be upgraded at all), 128 GB or 256 GB of flash storage standard (128 GB only starting February 13, 2013), an integrated Intel HD Graphics 4000 graphics processor that shares memory with the system, as well as an integrated 720p FaceTime HD webcam.

It does not have an internal optical drive.Connectivity includes 3-stream AirPort Extreme (802.11a/b/g/n), Bluetooth 4.0, two USB 3.0 ports, two "Thunderbolt" ports, an HDMI port, an audio in/out port, and an SDXC card slot. It does not have Gigabit Ethernet or Firewire "800," although adapters are available at extra cost.In addition, this model has a backlit keyboard, a "no button" glass "inertial" multi-touch trackpad, a "MagSafe 2" power adapter, and an internal, sealed battery that provides an Apple estimated 7 hours of battery life.

Also see: What are all the differences between the 13-Inch "Late 2012" Retina Display MacBook Pro models? What are all the differences between the 13-Inch "Late 2012" Retina Display MacBook Pro models and the regular 13-Inch "Mid-2012" MacBook Pro and MacBook Air? Buy This Mac or Trade-in Yours at site sponsor PowerMax. No sales tax. Sell This Mac for fast cash at site sponsor BuyBackWorld. Instant quote & more.

Upgrade This Mac or Buy one Used at site sponsor MacSales.com. SSDs & more. Parts for This Mac at site sponsor BeetsTech. Logic boards, interior cables & more. Tech Specs Ports Global Original Prices Popular Q&As Click on the category for related details. The most commonly needed info is "open" by default, but all info is important. Introduction Date: October 23, 2012 Discontinued Date: October 22, 2013* Details: The "Introduction Date" refers to the date a model was introduced via press release.

The "Discontinued Date" refers to the date a model either was replaced by a subsequent system or production otherwise ended.*On February 13, 2013, Apple lowered the price of the entry-level MD212LL/A configuration with a 128 GB SSD to US$1499 and discontinued the higher-end MD213LL/A configuration with a 256 GB SSD (although the entry level model still could be custom configured with a 256 GB SSD for an additional US$200).

This model was discontinued entirely on October 22, 2013.Also see: All Macs introduced in 2012. Processors: 1 (2 Cores) Architecture: 64-Bit Geekbench 2 (32): 6624 Geekbench 2 (64): 7210 Details: Geekbench 2 benchmarks are in 32-bit and 64-bit modes, respectively. These numbers reflect an average of user provided 32-bit and 64-bit results as submitted to the Geekbench website. Higher numbers are better.

You also might be interested in reviewing all 32-bit and 64-bit Geekbench 2 user submissions for Macs with the MacBookPro10,2 Model Identifier, which may include multiple models.To dynamically compare Geekbench 2 results from different Macs side-by-side, see EveryMac.com's Ultimate Mac Comparison. Geekbench 3 (32): 2488 Geekbench 3 (32): 5045 Details: These Geekbench 3 benchmarks are in 32-bit mode and are for a single processor core and all processor cores, respectively.

Both numbers reflect an average of user provided results as submitted to the Geekbench website. Higher numbers are better.You also might be interested in reviewing all 32-bit single core and multicore Geekbench 3 user submissions for Macs with the MacBookPro10,2 Model Identifier, which may include multiple models.To dynamically compare 32-bit Geekbench 3 results from different Macs side-by-side, see EveryMac.

com's Ultimate Mac Comparison. Geekbench 3 (64): 2747 Geekbench 3 (64): 5654 Details: These Geekbench 3 benchmarks are in 64-bit mode and are for a single processor core and all processor cores, respectively. Both numbers reflect an average of user provided results as submitted to the Geekbench website. Higher numbers are better.You also might be interested in reviewing all 64-bit single core and multicore Geekbench 3 user submissions for Macs with the MacBookPro10,2 Model Identifier, which may include multiple models.

To dynamically compare 64-bit Geekbench 3 results from different Macs side-by-side, see EveryMac.com's Ultimate Mac Comparison. Processor Speed: 2.5 GHz Processor Type: Core i5 (I5-3210M) Details: This model is powered by a 22 nm, 64-bit Intel Mobile Core i5 "Ivy Bridge" (I5-3210M) processor which includes two independent processor "cores" on a single silicon chip. Each core has a dedicated 256k level 2 cache, shares 3 MB of level 3 cache, and has an integrated memory controller (dual channel).

This system also supports "Turbo Boost 2.0" -- which "automatically increases the speed of the active cores" to improve performance when needed (up to 3.1 GHz for this model) -- and "Hyper Threading" -- which allows the system to recognize four total "cores" or "threads" (two real and two virtual).Also see: How fast are the 13-Inch Retina Display "Late 2012" MacBook Pro models compared to one another? How fast are they compared to the 15-Inch Retina Display MacBook Pro, 13-Inch non-Retina Display MacBook Pro, and 13-Inch MacBook Air "Mid-2012" models? Turbo Boost: 3.

1 GHz Custom Speeds: 2.9 GHz (Core i7) Details: This model also could be custom configured with a 2.9 GHz Core i7 (I7-3520M) for an extra US$200. This custom processor has a 4 MB level 3 cache and supports "Turbo Boost 2.0" up to 3.6 GHz as well as "Hyper Threading" with four virtual cores or "threads."As requested by readers, EveryMac.com also has documented this custom configuration as its own model.

Also see: How much faster is the 13-Inch Retina Display "Late 2012" MacBook Pro custom configured with a faster processor than the stock models? Is the extra performance worth the extra cost? Processor Upgrade: Soldered FPU: Integrated Details: Also see: Can you upgrade the processor in the Retina Display-equipped MacBook Pro models? System Bus Speed: 5 GT/s* Cache Bus Speed: 2.5 GHz (Built-in) Details: *This system has a "Direct Media Interface" (DMI) that "connects between the processor and chipset" in lieu of a traditional system bus.

Intel reports that it runs at 5 GT/s. ROM/Firmware Type: EFI EFI Architecture: 64-Bit Details: N/A L1 Cache: 32k/32k x2 L2/L3 Cache: 256k x2, 3 MB* Details: *Each core has its own dedicated 256k level 2 cache and the system has 3 MB of shared level 3 cache. RAM Type: DDR3L SDRAM* Min. RAM Speed: 1600 MHz Details: *Ships standard with 8 GB of 1600 MHz DDR3L SDRAM onboard. Standard RAM: 8 GB* Maximum RAM: 8 GB* Motherboard RAM: 8 GB* RAM Slots: None Details: *There are no RAM slots.

8 GB of RAM is onboard. It cannot be upgraded. Video Card: HD Graphics 4000 VRAM Type: Integrated Details: This model has an Intel HD Graphics 4000 graphics processor that shares memory with the system. Standard VRAM: 768 MB* Maximum VRAM: 768 MB* Details: *Apple and Intel do not report the minimum memory usage for the Intel HD Graphics 4000 graphics processor. However, OS X reports 768 MB of RAM is used for video.

Built-in Display: 13.3" Widescreen Native Resolution: 2560x1600 Details: This model has a 13.3" color widescreen LED-backlit display with IPS technology with a 2560 by 1600 native resolution at 227 ppi (178-degree viewing angle). It also supports scaled resolutions of 1680 by 1050, 1440 by 900, and 1024 by 640.Also see: How can you "force" or "hack" the Retina Display MacBook Pro models to run at the native resolution or otherwise fit more on screen than by default?In the US, site sponsor BeetsTech sells Apple OEM parts.

Apple parts available include display panels, logic boards, graphics cards, interior cables and sensors, and more for this MacBook Pro.Worldwide, site sponsor Shenzhen Parts sells quality, brand new, factory-direct parts with global shipping and bulk discounts for repair shops. Replacement parts include displays, keyboards, trackpads, speakers, cameras, and more for this MacBook Pro. 2nd Display Support: Dual/Mirroring* 2nd Max.

Resolution: 2560x1600 (x2*) Details: *This model supports a simultaneous maximum resolution up to 2560x1600 on two external displays via Thunderbolt. Alternately, it can support a single display up to 2560x1600 via Thunderbolt and a single display up to 1920x1200 via HDMI. Although it can theoretically power all three external displays, as confirmed by a helpful reader, it runs too hot with three displays connected.

Also see: How many external displays can the Retina Display MacBook Pro models support? What is the maximum supported resolution of each? Are adapters required? Standard Storage: 128, 256 GB SSD Std. Storage Speed: N/A Details: This model has 128 GB (MD212LL/A) or 256 GB (MD213LL/A) of flash storage rather than a hard drive. Originally, the MD212LL/A configuration also could be equipped with 256 GB, 512 GB, or 768 GB of flash storage for an extra US$300, US$800, or US$1300, respectively.

On February 13, 2013, Apple lowered the prices of these three SSD options to US$200, US$500, and US$900, respectively. The MD213LL/A configuration, which was discontinued February 13, 2013, originally could be equipped, again, at the time of purchase, with 512 GB or 768 GB of flash storage for an extra US$500 or US$1000.Apple does not intend for one to upgrade the SSD after purchase, but it is quite possible.

Also see: How do you upgrade or replace the storage in the 13-Inch Retina Display "Late 2012" MacBook Pro models? Is it the same storage and process as the 15-Inch Retina Display "Mid-2012" MacBook Pro? Is it possible?In the US (and many other countries), site sponsor Other World Computing sells storage upgrades for this MacBook Pro.In the UK, site sponsor Flexx sells storage upgrades for this MacBook Pro.

In Australia, site sponsor RamCity sells storage upgrades for this MacBook Pro.In Southeast Asia, site sponsor SimplyMac.sg sells storage upgrades for this MacBook Pro.Also see: SSD Compatibility Guide for All G3 & Later Macs. Storage Dimensions: Proprietary (7 mm*) Storage Interface: Proprietary* (6 Gb/s) Details: *Site sponsor OWC has determined that their SSD for the 15-Inch Retina Display MacBook Pro also will work in the 13-Inch Retina Display models and a 2.

5" SSD that is 7 mm in height or smaller may work if equipped with a custom cable, too. Standard Optical: None* Standard Disk: None Details: *This MacBook Pro does not have an internal optical drive. Site sponsor PowerMax offers the external Apple USB SuperDrive for US$79. It writes DVD+R DL and DVD-R DL at 4X, DVD-R and DVD+R at 8X, DVD-RW at 6X, DVD+RW at 8X, reads DVD at 8X, writes CD-R at 24X, writes CD-RW at 16X, and reads CD at 24X.

Site sponsor Other World Computing also has a variety of compact external optical drive options that may be of interest, including some with Blu-ray capability.Also see: What are the full capabilities of the external SuperDrive available for this MacBook Pro? Can it be used with other Macs? Standard Modem: None Standard Ethernet: None* Details: *This model does not have an internal Ethernet port.

However, an Apple Thunderbolt to Gigabit Ethernet adapter is offered for US$29. Standard AirPort: 802.11a/b/g/n (3-Stream) Standard Bluetooth: 4.0 Details: AirPort Extreme (802.11a/b/g/n) and Bluetooth 4.0 standard.Also see: What is 802.11n? How is it different from 802.11b, 802.11g, and 802.11a? USB Ports: 2 (3.0) Firewire Ports: None Details: Two USB 3.0 ports (up to 5 Gbps). It does not have a Firewire port although an Apple Thunderbolt to Firewire adapter is available.

Expansion Slots: SDXC Card Slot Expansion Bays: None Details: This model has an SDXC card slot. No expansion bays are provided.In the US (and many other countries), site sponsor Other World Computing sells a wide variety of external expansion options and accessories, including docking stations, adapters, input devices, cases, and more for this MacBook Pro.In Australia, site sponsor Macfixit offers an extensive selection of external expansion options and accessories like docks, stands, chargers, cases, security products, and more for this MacBook Pro.

Also see: Which SD Card storage solution is best for the Retina Display MacBook Pro? Which models are compatible? Is this type of storage safe? Incl. Keyboard: Full-size Incl. Input: Trackpad (Inertial) Details: Apple reports that the backlit integrated keyboard has "78 (US) or 79 (ISO) keys, including 12 function keys, 4 arrow keys (inverted "T" arrangement) with ambient light sensor."The glass multi-touch trackpad supports "inertial scrolling, pinch, rotate, swipe, three-finger swipe, four-finger swipe, tap, double-tap, and drag capabilities".

Case Type: Notebook Form Factor: 13" MacBook Pro (Retina) Details: This MacBook Pro uses a thin black and silver "unibody" case design milled from a single piece of aluminum with a "catchless" magnetic latch. Apple Order No: MD212LL/A* Apple Subfamily: Retina Late 2012 Details: *MD212LL/A refers to the configuration with 128 GB of flash storage and MD213LL/A refers to the configuration with 256 GB of flash storage.

The MD213LL/A standard configuration was discontinued February 13, 2013. Apple Model No: A1425 (EMC 2557) Model ID: MacBookPro10,2 Details: Please note that these identifiers refer to more than one model.Also see: All Macs with the A1425 Model Number, the 2557 EMC Number, and the MacBookPro10,2 Model Identifier.For more about these identifiers and how to locate them on each Mac, please refer to EveryMac.

com's Mac Identification section. Battery Type: 74 W h Li-Poly Battery Life: 7 Hours Details: Apple reports that this model has a "74-watt-hour lithium-polymer battery" that provides "up to 7 hours of wireless web" use. It cannot be upgraded by an end-user.Also see: How do you replace the battery in the 13-Inch Retina Display "Late 2012" MacBook Pro? Is it more or less difficult than the 15-Inch Retina Display "Mid-2012" models? Is it possible? Pre-Installed MacOS: X 10.

8.2 (12C2034) Maximum MacOS: Current* Details: *This system fully supports the last version of OS X 10.8 "Mountain Lion." OS X 10.9 "Mavericks", and OS X 10.10 "Yosemite" as well as OS X 10.11 "El Capitan." It is capable of running macOS Sierra (10.12) as well, although it does not support the Auto Unlock feature. Finally, this model is capable of running macOS High Sierra (10.13), and it supports HEVC (High-Efficiency Video Coding), but it does not support hardware accelerated HEVC.

Also see: Which Macs are compatible with macOS High Sierra (10.13)? What are the system requirements? Which Macs support HEVC? Minimum Windows: 7 (64-Bit)* Maximum Windows: 10 (64-Bit)* Details: *Apple's Boot Camp 5 supports the 64-bit version of Windows 7 and Windows 8 and Boot Camp 6 supports the 64-bit version of Window 10. Earlier versions of Windows are not supported. MacOS 9 Support: None Windows Support: Boot/Virtualization Details: Also see: Are there any third-party programs to run Mac OS 9/Classic applications on Intel Macs?Site sponsor OHS specializes in heavily upgraded Macs capable of running both Mac OS X and Mac OS 9 applications.

For more on running Windows on Intel Macs, please refer to the exhaustive Windows on Mac Q&A. Dimensions: 0.75 x 12.35 x 8.62 Avg. Weight: 3.57 lbs (1.62 kg) Details: In inches while closed - height by width by depth, (1.9 cm, 31.4 cm, 21.9 cm). Original Price (US): US$1699, US$1999 Est. Current Retail: US$900-US$1100 Details: This model originally sold with either 128 GB of flash storage (MD212LL/A) for US$1699 or 256 GB of flash storage (MD213LL/A) for US$1999.

On February 13, 2013, Apple lowered the price of the entry-level MD212LL/A to US$1499 and discontinued the MD213LL/A configuration.Please note that on average the estimated current retail pricing of used systems is updated twice a year (please refer to the date on the bottom of the page for the date last updated).Photo Credit: Apple, Inc. Click on a category for additional details. The most commonly needed info is "open" by default, but all info is important.

The icons correspond with the icons for each port on the computer. Global original prices for the MacBook Pro "Core i5" 2.5 13" Retina 2012 in 34 different countries and territories follow; organized alphabetically by region. For global original prices for Intel Macs in one particular country on a single page, please refer to EveryMac.com's Global Original Prices section. Original Prices - North & South America Canada: C$1699, C$1999 Brazil: R$6.

999, R$8.299 Mexico: MXN $28,999, $33,999 United States: US$1699, US$1999 Original Prices - Europe Austria: €1749, €2049 Belgium: €1779, €2079 Denmark: DKK 13,699, 15,999 Finland: €1799, €2129 France: €1749, €2049 Germany: €1749, €2049 Ireland: €1799, €2129 Italy: €1779, €2079 Luxembourg: €1690,79, €1975,91 Netherlands: €1779, €2079 Norway: NOK 13.990, 16.

490 Portugal: €1799, €2129 Spain: €1779, €2079 Sweden: SEK 16.495, 19.495 Switzerland: CHF 1'929, 2'279 United Kingdom: £1449, £1699 Original Prices - Asia China: RMB 12,488, 14,988 Hong Kong: HK$12,988, HK$15,488 India: Rs 81,900 Indonesia: Rp 17,999,000, 20,999,000 Japan: ¥144,800, ¥168,800 Korea: KRW 2,270,000, 2,670,000 Malaysia: RM 5,299, 6,199 The Philippines: PHP 82,990, 97,990 Singapore: S$2,388, S$2,788 Taiwan: NT$53,900, NT$63,900 Thailand: THB 56,900, 66,900 Vietnam: VND 39,999,000, 46,999,000 Original Prices - Australia & New Zealand Australia: A$1899, A$2199 New Zealand: NZ$2699, NZ$3199 If you have additional original prices for this model, please get in touch.

Thank you. Ten of the most popular Q&As about the MacBook Pro models follow. Permalink | E-mail a Friend | Bookmark & Share | Report an Error/Typo Suggest an Addition | Sign Up for Bimonthly Site Update Notices << MacBook Pro (Home) | Also see: MacBook Pro FAQ EveryMac.com is provided "as is" without warranty of any kind whatsoever. EveryMac.com, and the author thereof, shall not be held responsible or liable, under any circumstances, for any damages resulting from the use or inability to use the information within.

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See Also: Pos Touch Screen Monitor

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Apple's new 13-inch MacBook Pro, the version without the new Touch Bar, is a curious laptop. On one hand, the "Pro" moniker suggests that it's aimed at professionals just like every model in the line-up has been since the MacBook Pro debuted in 2006. On the other, Apple positions the most affordable 2016 MacBook Pro as an ideal replacement for its ageing MacBook Air due to the machine’s thin dimensions, similar specs and near-identical weight.

This has led some people to suggest that Apple should have called this non-Touch Bar model the "MacBook Plus," or even just the "13-inch MacBook." That, they say, would indicate its suitability for on-the-go users looking for an upgrade from the 12-inch MacBook, or Air, rather than professionals who tend to require oodles of power and a platter of ports. Factors such as higher cost and longer shipping times for the 13-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar mean that people will inevitably take a chance on its more modest sibling, starting at £1,499 ($1,499 or AUS$2,199).

The question is: can it live up to the second part of its name, or should professional users hold out for the Touch? Design Even without the alluring Retina Touch Bar display strip above the keyboard, the MacBook Pro is a gorgeous machine that oozes class. If you value simplicity and the tactile feel of function row keys, you may even prefer it to the more expensive model. Based on the same design philosophy as the 12-inch MacBook, there is barely any wasted space on any part of the machine.

Even the area to the left and right the keyboard now houses two speaker grilles that emit loud and full-bodied sound. The new MacBook Pro measures 14.9mm (0.58 inches) thick, and is 17% thinner with 23% less volume compared to the previous generation model. It’s still shaped like a Pro, keeping the same thickness throughout the base, unlike the MacBook Air’s tapered design. It may not be the complete redesign that some were hoping for, but it's undeniably premium and solid to boot, thanks to its all-aluminum enclosure.

Laptops do not receive better build quality than this. At a hair more than three pounds, the MacBook Pro weighs almost the same as the Air. Whether you’re picking it up using a single hand or slipping it into a backpack for transportation, the half-a-pound weight saved compared to the previous 13-inch Pro makes a huge difference to portability. The MacBook Pro comes in two colors: space gray and silver.

The former isn’t new to Apple, but it’s the first time it’s appeared as an option for a MacBook Pro and the moody shade contrasts beautifully against the various shades of black, gunmetal silver and gray adorning the keyboard, hinge and bezel. It also matches the Apple logo on the lid, which has taken the 12-inch MacBook’s lead and no longer glows. (For shame!) If you prefer to use macOS 10.

12 Sierra and its applications in Dark Mode, space gray is the natural choice. Upgrading MacBook Air owners seeking familiarity, on the other hand, will prefer the Silver option. Connectivity Previous 13-inch Pros featured a healthy array of connections – including HDMI, mini DisplayPort, two USB-A ports an an SD card reader. This new version?  Not so much. All of the above have been replaced with two Thunderbolt 3.

0-speed USB-C connections. The multi-talented USB-C standard allows you to connect peripherals and hook up external displays to your MacBook while charging the machine at the same time. Far more versatile than USB-A and capable of much faster transfer speeds (40Gbps versus 60MBps), USB-C is undoubtedly the future of connectivity. However, Apple’s decision to only include two ports on this entry-level MacBook Pro is an unfortunate limitation, and it also positions the machine as a direct MacBook Air successor.

In fact, the 13-inch MacBook is more compromised than the Air because, assuming that you want to keep one USB-C port free at all times to charge it, that leaves you with a single port for connecting devices. Want to use a mechanical keyboard and a wired mouse? Then you’re going to need a USB-C adapter that provides additional USB-A ports. Additionally, you’re only going to be able to use one high-resolution screen while charging the MacBook, which can support up to two 4K displays or one 5K panel.

The answer to all of this would be a dock that charges the MacBook while adding another USB-C Thunderbolt 3.0 port capable of outputting video. Docks promising such functionality have appeared from time to time on Kickstarter and similar websites, but the only ones to have seen light of day have come with USB-C ports that support charging, rather than outputting to a high-resolution display. It would have been nice to see Apple place a USB-C port on either side of the machine too, rather than the left-hand side, as their close proximity risks there not being enough room for dongles and adapters to co-exist side-by-side.

Using an Anker USB-C to USB-A adapter alongside a regular USB-C adapter, for example, is a tight squeeze and has to be pushed in with force. Keyboard and trackpad Much has been said about the new MacBook Pro's keyboard, which use an evolved version of Apple's Butterfly switches that debuted in the 12-inch MacBook's keyboard. Its keys possess the same 0.5mm of travel (or distance to depress), meaning that the two keyboards feel very similar to type on.

However, the second-generation switches in the new MacBook elicit a subtle snap that almost feels like a very low-profile mechanical keyboard under the fingers. It’s a drastic change coming from older MacBook Pros, and has both a positive and negative effect. On the plus side, the new keyboard is a fantastic fit for the new MacBook’s aesthetic. It has allowed Apple to achieve the machine’s slim dimensions, features per-key backlighting that results in zero light bleed, and its enlarged keycaps make sense considering the MacBook’s newly enlarged trackpad.

It offers a much improved typing experience over both the 12-inch MacBook and previous MacBook Pros. The switches' clicky nature allows you to settle into a more comfortable typing rhythm, and it's possible to bash out plenty of words in a short space of time. The unfortunate part is that hammering on them for hours a day, as we have been for the past week, starts to feel like a chore after a while.

Typing never becomes uncomfortable, but it is curiously unsatisfying. The wobble of the MacBook Air and Pro's keys almost gave them character as you bounced from one key to the next. In comparison, the new Pro's keys are cold, harsh and calculated; undoubtedly efficient yet lacking in personality. We're confident that this could be alleviated with a little bit more travel – say, up to 1mm or even 1.

5mm. For now, the keyboard is adequate, and with some minor adjustments it could go from being something that's easy to like to being easy to love.

Wilma Lawrence

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